Specials

Pretty In Pink Six Pack

$134.99

Pretty-in-Pink 6 Pack

 Regular Price 149.99 - NOW 134.99

When I first got into the wine industry a few decades ago, rosé was anything but cool. White Zinfandel from California made the public think that all rosé was sweet, and unfortunately, imports such as Royal Lancers from Portugal and wines such as Sutter Home White Zin confirmed this notion.

 

Today, however, rosé is the second fastest growing segment of the wine market – the United States is the second largest rosé consuming country in the world, following France of course! It accounts for nearly 10% of all wine made worldwide. You’ll find rosé at high-end restaurants and corner grocery stores alike.

 

The dry rosés from Provence did more to change people’s perception of pink wine than anything else. Domaine Tempier’s Bandol rosé started to have a huge cult following in the 90’s and other producers from this area were able to ride its coat tails.

 

There are a few ways to make rosé. One is to “bleed” some of the juice from red wine during the maceration process. This is called “saignée.” It also serves the purpose of concentrating phenolics in the red. Instead of just discarding the left over wine, some wineries bottle it as rosé. Lightly pressing red grapes to extract just enough color to give the wine a pink hue is another method. This is how “vin gris” is made. Of course mixing red and white wine together is another way.

 

Most rosé made in the United States is still sweet and that might account for why imported rosé sales are growing while domestic rosé sales have gone down. However, there has been a proliferation of dry rosé made in California and many of these wines are every bit as good as the pink wines other countries have to offer.

 

In fact, California rosé is as diverse as the state. So long as a producer has access to red grapes, rosé can be made. MCEVOY uses Pinot Noir, and LORENZA creates a Grenache, Syrah and Mourvedre blend that is similar to the rosé from Provence. White grapes can also be added to the blend. Some producers prefer lighter, lower alcohol versions while others go for a fuller and often fruitier style. A few rosés have a touch of noticeable residual sugar yet many are bone dry. As rosé is usually considered a warm weather wine, most people want it to be crisp and refreshing more than anything else.

 

We’re having a “Rose and Summer White “tasting Saturday August 27, We will feature five rosés and 1 “special white” from different parts of the state and composed of a variety of grapes, this selection really captures the variety and quality of rosé California has to offer. If you’re in the area be sure to stop by from 1-5 P.M.

 

For those who cannot attend the tasting I have a “six pack” special – 10% OFF THIS WEEK ONLY!

REG 149.99 - NOW 134.99

HERMAN STORY 2015 ROSE OF GRENACHE "AFTER HOURS"

LORENZA 2015 ROSE (RHONE BLEND)

MCEVOY 2015 ROSE OF PINOT NOIR "ROSEBUD"

DRAGONETTE 2015 ROSE OF GSM "HAPPY CANYON" SANTA BARBARA

WALTER HANSEL 2015 ROSE OF PINOT NOIR "ESTATE" RUSSIAN RIVER VALLEY

 

Plus a non-rose to fill out the “summer-selection” tasting six pack!


ARBE GARBE 2015 PROPRIETARY WHITE, RUSSIAN RIVER VALLEY

 


 

 

 


Add to Cart: